The Benchleys of Nantucket

The “first” Robert Benchley was the one I thought I sort of knew, as much as you can know someone who died 11 years before you were born. He wrote brilliantly and hilariously for The New Yorker and Vanity Fair, won an Oscar and, by all accounts, acquitted himself with distinction at the Algonquin in New York. Up there with Dorothy Parker, et. al.

Among his more self-deprecating bons mots:

“It took me fifteen years to discover I had no talent for writing, but I couldn’t give it up because by that time I was too famous.”

We should all be so lucky. Few could be arguably as skilled.

R.B. is buried in the family plot on Nantucket. My partner, Nancy, and I didn’t visit there this past weekend, in our time on Nantucket. We were with a living Benchley, Rob (the third) and his lovely wife Carol, and we didn’t talk about literature or the family tree much at all. We were too busy enjoying the present tense … good food, long walks along the sand bluffs in Sconset, the bustle of an island household, Rose the tennis-ball fixated dog, skinnydipping in the Atlantic and stops in town to visit boutiques where Nancy would like to sell her fiber artist clothing creations … mostly scarves and ponchos, but she’ll make about anything if someone gets her going and wants something specific. Benji’s Boutique, a new place on Easy Street, took all of her scarves and wants more, besides. And that was the point of the trip, which made it a happy one in every way that it could be.

Where was I? Oh, yeah. I hadn’t really had any idea about the Benchley family tree. “A lot of cousins,” the present day Rob said, laconically. Which was plenty to go on, when I got home. There was a lot of begatting in the Benchley family. They include the writer and actor Nat and also Peter, most famous for writing Jaws … Peter and Nat’s dad, Nathaniel Benchley wrote children’s literature, was a biographer of Humphrey Bogart’s and wrote the novel on which the 1961 movie The Russians are Coming was based.

There are probably more famous Benchleys. That is as far as I got.

It is Rob III and Carol, though, who have made their mark on Nantucket island as much or more so than any of the clan, and not really because Rob is an extraordinary photographer for the local papers and sometimes for the Boston Globe. It is more because they are real islanders, deeply involved in the local community and passionate about the preservation of the natural beauty that surrounds them.

I met an older fellow on the ferry going back to the mainland who is another “real” islander, and asked him if he knew the Benchleys.

“Of course,” he said. “Rob is a real icon on the island.”

“People say the darnedest things on that boat,” Rob responded, when I told him in an e-mail about the comment.

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An Unusual Resume

I’ve always had sort of a roguish curriculum vitae, I guess. Why “roguish?” I’m certain most employers would (or have) describe/d it differently and with less charm. But I think it is the right word because, for example, I could probably add that I was first mate on a pirate ship and people would think it made perfect sense.

The version of it I’ve had up on careerbuilder dot com and monster dot com (no links for you guys, hah) has never done me a whit of good … I think HR departments are good at screening out rogues. The last time a resume played any role in getting me a job, I think it was 1981.

Yesterday, I debated deleting myself from the aforementioned job sites because they do me no good and, increasingly, they let their clients spam me for sales and/or multilevel marketing jobs, which makes me crazy. But instead I tried a writing experiment. I added *this* to the top of my resumes:

“I don’t see any point in writing a boilerplate “objective” designed to squeeze me through the HR funnel to interviewers on the way to Cubicleland, or even a corner office. If you’re unnerved that I would say so, please don’t bother me. I’m busy. You might be getting paid to seek me out, but I’m not getting paid to listen to you.

“If, on the other hand, you’re someone who needs a wickedly smart person who writes anything as well as anyone, has a tremendous range of skills and interests and knows how to get things done, you’re invited to try and get my interest. Please start with email. Try to be clever. I treat online job sites just as I would a dating site. I’m choosy because I can be. And I won’t chase YOU unless you’re irresistible.”

What do you think? Can’t hurt, right? I do crack myself up sometimes …

Launched Prisma Dental Blog … Yay! :-)

Feb. 21, 2008The Prisma Dental Blog is up and running. It’s a site that I think, over time, will do a lot to inform people who need major dental work about the option of having it done in Costa Rica. I do not often get directly involved with recommending specific overseas medical facilities but I make an exception, always, for Prisma — since I have my own personal experience there. Over the last four years, I’ve corresponded with and spoken with hundreds of people about my own dental work. And I remain thrilled … Continue reading

Medical Travel on TV News

Medical travel continues to garner considerable media coverage. News 14 Carolina did this story yesterday; I post it in part because I’m included in the interview. They’ve got the before-and-after shots of my teeth in there as well, from 2004.

Get the Flash Player to see the wordTube Media Player.

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My So-Called Life, in Six Words

Yep. There I am on page 127 of “Not Quite What I Was Planning: Six-Word Memoirs by Writers Famous and Obscure.”

Smith Magazine got the idea, see, from Hemingway, that one can say quite a lot in six words, which of course, one can, whether one is famous or obscure. Most of us would be the latter.

“After Harvard, had baby with crackhead,” Robin Templeton’s six words that lead off the book … well, those are pretty lively, huh?

It took me a few years to get my answer to the question of what happened to my marriage down to … let’s see … ten words, which I’m not revealing here. That was a long time ago. I’m not going to try to knock it down to six. Unless someone wants to publish it.

My six words included “serendipity,” which is sort of cliché, or at least it’s a word I get tired of periodically. But I’m not going to give you the other five words here. Go read the book.

Or give me your own six-word memoir in a comment, and I’ll play catch-and-throw.

the writing thing …

I haven’t written much about writing and I don’t think I will. Every once in a while, though, I get a glimmer of insight into how and why I do what I do.

I have a book to write, I am pretty sure of that right now. And so there is writing to do.

And there is research to do, a ton of research. There are places to go and … activities to observe.

There are also many conversations to have. Interviews are part of research, but I differentiate. Research prepares me to have good conversations.

But it occurs to me, in the end, that when I go to actually write my next book, I won’t be ready until …

until I can sort of remember the whole book, even though it hasn’t been written. It will get written when, in some way, I can remember the words to it and how they sound.

It’s a strange plan, but I think it works for me.

For those who want less esoteric advice, I recommend Stephen King’s “On Writing.” Even if you don’t like Stephen King’s bestsellers (I mostly don’t) and even if you think he’s a hack writer (he’s not) … if you care about writing, read his book about it. I think I need to read it again, in fact.

There’s been this pile next to the bedside table for more than a month now. It’s great to have new things to read.

Globe and Mail: Sun, Sand and Surgery … Today

The Globe and Mail, the newspaper of record in Canada with a weekly circulation of something like two million, leads their travel section today with a big article on medical tourism. Dave McGinn does a nice job looking at the phenomenon from the Canadian perspective, and I’m not just saying so because he interviewed me and mentioned my book, Beauty from Afar (though that certainly doesn’t hurt him, here.)

“As the demand for prompt, affordable medical services grows, more and more countries are encouraging foreigners to visit and take advantage of their health-care systems – for a fee.”

That’s how McGinn’s editor sums up the situation.

Among the chief reasons I like what McGinn did is that he didn’t body-surf the tidal wave of publicity for Thailand and/or India and researched other up-and-coming destinations. McGinn looks at Cuba, which I’d like to know more about and is more of a destination for Canadians than for U.S. residents; and also covers Costa Rica, Portugal and Spain, South Korea and Taiwan.

It was just the other day that my dentists in Costa Rica were telling me that they are seeing more and more Canadian patients.

The Globe and Mail couldn’t resist the almost cliche headline of “Sun, sand and surgery,” though I am sure that is not Dave’s doing. Copy editors | page designers are in a hurry. Been there, done that as well.

(article link to Globe and Mail Story)